HOW TO RUN FASTER, HARDER…AND PREVENT INJURY

February 26, 2019

WHAT CAUSES RUNNING INJURIES

Running injuries are contributed to by many factors from inappropriate footwear and inefficiencies in foot mechanics/limitations in mobility, to training too hard too soon.

At Pro Feet Podiatry a lot of the injuries we manage are a result of exceeding tissue capacity. Put simply this is when we ask our bodies (muscles, tendons, joints or bones) to do more than they are capable of and an injury occurs as a result of overloading those capabilities.

This is just like overflowing a bucket of water or filling a balloon with too much air and having it pop.

 

HOW TO PREVENT RUNNING INJURIES

Just as you can use a bigger bucket to hold more water or a bigger balloon will hold more air, you can increase your tissue capacity so you are able to run further harder or more often with reduced injury risk.

This is achieved via strength training, which when completed consistently and progressed appropriately will make you stronger and more resilient through your feet and legs – bulletproofing your body!

 

STRENGTH TRAINING IMPROVES RUNNING

Strength training is also a staple of elite conditioning and leads to improvements in strength, power, running economy and muscle endurance.

It is the cherry on top of a well rounded training program that in addition to reducing injury risk will shave time off of your pb.

 

SO WHY ISN’T EVERYONE DOING IT?

-Most people are unaware of the benefits of strength training, they believe the only way to improve running is to run more

-They believe it takes too much time

-They don’t know how to start

The good news is strength training for performance and injury prevention doesn’t have to take a lot of time or be overly complex at the start.

Below is an introductory circuit you can start with at home today.

 

-Calf raises       3 x 15 on each leg

-Step ups          3 x 15 each leg

-Glute bridges   3 x 15 double legged

-Body weight squats  3 x 20

 

The circuit above targets major muscles in the thigh, calf, glutes and feet. The circuit can be completed 2-3 times a week at home when feeling fresh on an off day or before a run. You don’t require any equipment to begin with.

Initially the focus should be on keeping the movements slow and controlled. As your strength and capacity improves, the exercises can be progressed to more advanced variations, or weight can be added to continue to challenge your muscles.

At Pro Feet Podiatry we love helping runners achieve their goals. In addition to assessing your running and biomechanics of your feet, we can tailor strength programs specific to you that we can progress as your goals change and your strength increases.

If you would like to know anything more about running or strength training, we are here to help!

Jakob McCorkell 
jakob@profeetpodiatry.com.au